Screenshots of websites from the 2000s vs the standard website design frameworks now
Screenshots of websites from the 2000s vs the standard website design frameworks now
Screenshots of websites from the 2000s from www.webdesignmuseum.org vs the standard website design frameworks now

How it was like

In the early to mid-2000s, back when I just starting to learn about the web and web technologies, the amount of new and creative websites that I was seeing was at its all-time high. Flash (and Dreamweaver) was all the rage back then, providing website designers a tool that was much less limited compared to using a text editor. Scripting technologies (Js, JSP, PHP, GWT) were also trying to fight for the top position back then that was utilized by web devs to make their websites interact with their visitors. These tools helped web developers and animators translate their ideas…


A house of cards
A house of cards

During a product’s development life-cycle its developers make a lot of assumptions — understandably so. There are many principles that we understand to be true, ideas we think that are true, and biases we want to be true. All of these are mixed in together on how a product is made, and I believe, to start with that is totally fine. However, to survive and make a product thrive, the development and management of a product will need to validate a lot of these assumptions. That’s where an Assumption Stack comes in and how it could potentially help product development…


A woman walking 3 dogs while using her phone
A woman walking 3 dogs while using her phone
Photo by Robinson Greig on Unsplash

Ever since I learned and started creating User Personas for products I’ve wondered what are the most useful and efficient ways to have them integrated into development cycles.

Note that there are many ways to do this — print-outs, wikis, etc. which works fine depending on the context.

However, what I wanted was an additional way that wasn’t forced but accessible and constant.


A black and white photo of a robot’s back
A black and white photo of a robot’s back
Photo by Jesse Chan on Unsplash

Artificial Intelligence has captured our imagination since the invention of computers. Since its early days, we’ve put high expectations as to what it can do for us (think Jetsons) and to us (think Terminator 2). However, the effort and study of AI ( technology in general ) to help us, in the sense of being usable and useful, started late with HCI and Don Norman and other pioneering UX drives that resulted in an unbalanced expectation of what AI can do.

But before we begin, I think it is important to first define what AI is, at least in the…


A busy metro station in Japan
A busy metro station in Japan
Photo by Karen Lau on Unsplash

What is a mental shotgun?

we often compute much more than we want or need. I call this excess computation the mental shotgun — Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow

Daniel Kahneman’s states in his book that we don’t have much control over how our brain makes sense of things — that it is pretty much automatic and often makes sense of more things than necessary, hence the “shotgun” effect. Extending and applying Daniel Kahneman’s definition of what a mental shotgun is in usability means the collective “presentations” or “experiences” of your product to your users. How they receive and perceive all the information at…


A set of face icons ranging with moods ranging from indifferent, happy, and appalled
A set of face icons ranging with moods ranging from indifferent, happy, and appalled
A Good UX does not impose a Happy UX

When we started as UX practitioners some of us had a notion that a good UX is something that provides a beautiful experience but just visually. Many of us came from designing UIs and frontend development which is likely a reason for that perception. Sometimes, this expectation does not only come from the UX practitioner but from some stakeholder who has a related misconception that UX = UI. A well-balanced and catchy color palette, animated interactions, sweeping hero images. Those attributes do enhance the experience but not implicitly. …


Submit label vs Connect label
Submit label vs Connect label

Psychographic segmentation is a method that puts your audiences in categories that relate to their personalities and characteristics. This method is different from demographic segmentation because its data is not based on “hard evidence” e.g. age, place of birth but is based on subjective factors. This method fits nicely in the usability testing domain as qualitative research, observing your participants’ behavior, traits, interests, motivations.

How can this method be helpful for you as a UX practitioner and your users?

A short example would be for you to use a copy that resonates with your target audience based on how they are not what they are. Relabeling a call to action from “Submit” to “Connect” is…


My favorite books on UX, Product Design and Product Management article cover
My favorite books on UX, Product Design and Product Management article cover

I majored in Computer Science and had Solaris and Java Tech as my elective specialty back in university but my love in the tech world started when I designed and developed my first website with just HTML and CSS using notepad. My first jobs were mainly web development work, mostly around HTML, CSS, Js, JSP, and PHP and after those initial years, I’ve shifted to being a full-stack engineer and consultant. 7 years ago when I decided to jump back to the world of website design and development, I knew that I had to study and polish and introduce myself…


Stop lights. We use red in stop lights for its intrinsic properties, not because of its subjective definitions
Stop lights. We use red in stop lights for its intrinsic properties, not because of its subjective definitions
Photo by Wes Hicks on Unsplash

Tabula rasa — is the theory that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that therefore all knowledge comes from experience or perception.

If you’re reading this, you are likely not a newborn individual. That implies that your mental content all came from your experiences and your histories and your learnings. You are your experiences, your culture, your histories. This forms your understanding of the world and your preferences on how you want and like to operate in it. Your tendencies, favorites, and biases are molded by nature and culture.

This, naturally and understandably, introduces everyone to assumed “standards”…

Yel Legaspi

UX & Product Designer. Santiago, Chile. www.yellegaspi.com

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